• Phil Packer

Double World and 3 x National B1 Tennis Champion, Rachel Morgan supports the BRIT Ambassador family

We are thrilled that Rachel Morgan is part of our BRIT Ambassador family and is championing the annual BRIT Challenge to support and improve young adult mental health and fitness throughout the UK.

Rachel competes in the B1 (blind) category for players with the greatest degree of sight loss and has won several regional titles, three national titles, two World Championships and became the world number one in the B1 (blind) category.

World and National Champion - Rachel Morgan

I am absolutely delighted to be a BRIT ambassador for a second year.

As a student athlete myself, I know that many young adults are struggling with mental health difficulties. It’s very worrying that the COVID-19 pandemic has impacted on students who are vulnerable or live with existing mental health difficulties. The numbers of students and young adults needing vital support and specialist services are increasing dramatically; looking after our health, fitness and wellbeing has never been so important.

The BRIT Vision to support young adult and student mental health and fitness resonates with me both personally and professionally. BRIT are an innovative and collaborative charity who are continuing to forge partnerships across the charity sector to raise awareness of, and signpost, specialist services and support including; the MindOut LGBTQ Mental Health charity, PAPYRUS – Prevention of Young Suicide, Nightline Association, Samaritans Student Minds and the Charlie Waller Trust.

The annual BRIT Challenge is an inspiring initiative for every UK university, college, specialist college and Students’ Union to enter teams and encourage student and staff participation. I’m thrilled that every university and college team taking part in the BRIT Challenge are invited to choose a second charity to raise funds for, alongside BRIT, to support local, regional and national charities. The BRIT Challenge is an inclusive event with many ways to take part so that students and staff of all abilities can participate. It’s a great way to improve mental health and fitness on campus or at home.

“I am delighted to be a BRIT Ambassador and urge Olympians, Paralympians and elite athletes from all sports to join our BRIT Ambassador family; by promoting the BRIT Challenge at universities or colleges of our choice, helping to destigmatise mental health and championing equality, diversity and inclusion, together we can have a positive impact on improving young adult and student mental health throughout the UK.

I look forward to supporting and encouraging students at the University of East London and London Metropolitan University as they take on their BRIT Challenge.”

Rachel Morgan

Double World Champion and 3x National B1 Tennis Champion

Rachel Morgan - Double World and 3 x National Tennis Champion

Visually impaired tennis is an adaptation from the full court version of tennis and uses a smaller court marked out with lower nets and tactile lines, and an audible ball so players can hear it bounce.


Depending on a player’s degree of sight loss they may have between one and three bounces of the ball before returning it back to their opponent. Competitions take place across four sight categories, B1 to B4/B5 – with B1 players having the greatest degree of sight loss.


QUICK FACTS: Visually Impaired Tennis


· One of the fastest growing disability sports

· Ambitions for it to become a future Paralympic sport

· Adapted from the full court version of tennis to a smaller court, marked out with lower nets and tactile lines

· Uses an audible ball so players can hear it bounce

· Players compete in different categories, with B1 having the greatest degree of sight loss

· Depending on a player’s category they are allowed between one and three bounces of the ball

· Competitions are fun and friendly and take place regionally and nationally throughout the year


Anyone interested in giving visually impaired tennis a try can contact the Lawn Tennis Association (LTA).


It is one of the fastest growing disability sports with participation thriving around the country. You can learn more about visually impaired tennis or find a session near you on the LTA website or by emailing disabilitytennis@lta.org.uk


You can follow Rachel on Twitter and Instagram.